Economics: can socialist models be used constructively in struggling micro-economies ?

Is it possible to use socialism within broken socio-economic environments, such as a ‘poor side of town’, while the rest of the surrounding communities operate normally as open marketplaces.

The thought here is that strategically implementing a complete and comprehensive socialist infrastructure within a broken community would offer an opportunity for comprehensive revitalization, it being managed macroscopically, by a democratically elected board such as a municipal government.

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2 responses

  1. How would the wealth be redistributed if no centralized wealth exists with in said community. Who would over see the economic development, the state or the fed? How do you justify the special treatment to surrounding burroughs? United State’s citizens are terrified by radical change — more so when terms like “socialism” are used. Call it an Urban Relief Program and you might be able to get away with it. But if there was a time when it could have been used it would have been in the Bronx in the 1970’s when the city looked like the shelled out remains of Kosovo. Gerald Ford refused to give the Bronx a federal loan when he could have tried to jumpstart the dwindling socio-economic situation. I don’t doubt it could work though.

  2. In social strata where a substantial portion of families are dysfunctional, a hue and cry arises for solutions. The state forms the most visible and powerful familial substitute. State solutions may be effective when the state rescues the poor from injustice. This give opportunity for the poor to begin to support themselves.

    Where familial dysfunction may rightly be blamed broadly on the populace of the given social strata, the state has very limited possibilities for improvement. When the state becomes dysfunctional, or when a burdensome portion of the population does, what then? One crisis at a time.

    Peter Rubel

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